Arts & English for young learners

16 June 2011

Filed under: General — cristinmcggi23 @ 19:36

ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM

    A painting movement in which artists typically applied paint rapidly, and with force to their huge canvases in an effort to show feelings and emotions, painting gesturally, non-geometrically, sometimes applying paint with large brushes, sometimes dripping or even throwing it onto canvas. Their work is characterized by a strong dependence on what appears to be accident and chance, but which is actually highly planned. Some Abstract Expressionist artists were concerned with adopting a peaceful and mystical approach to a purely abstract image. Usually there was no effort to represent subject matter. Not all work was abstract, nor was all work expressive, but it was generally believed that the spontaneity of the artists’ approach to their work would draw from and release the creativity of their unconscious minds. The expressive method of painting was often considered as important as the painting itself.

   Abstract Expressionism originated in the 1940s, and became popular in the 1950s.

    Artists who painted in this style include Hans Hoffman, Adolph Gottlieb, Mark Rothko Willem De Kooning ,Clyfford Still, Barnett Newman…

POP ART

   Pop Art emerged in the mid 1950s in England, but realized its fullest potential in New York in the ’60s where it shared, with Minimalism, the attentions of the art world.

   It is a moot point as to whether the most extraordinary innovation of 20th-century art was Cubism or Pop Art. Both arose from a rebellion against an accepted style: the Cubists thought Post-Impressionist artists were too tame and limited, while Pop Artists thought the Abstract Expressionists pretentious and over-intense. Pop Art brought art back to the material realities of everyday life, to popular culture (hence “pop”), in which ordinary people derived most of their visual pleasure from television, magazines, or comics.

   The most famous of the Pop artists, the cult figure Andy Warhol, recreated quasi-photographic paintings of people or everyday objects.

IMPRESSIONISM   

Impressionism, French Impressionism, a major movement, first in painting and later in music, that developed chiefly in France during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Impressionist painting comprises the work produced between about 1867 and 1886 by a group of artists who shared a set of related approaches and techniques. The most conspicuous characteristic of Impressionism was an attempt to accurately and objectively record visual reality in terms of transient effects of light and colour. The principal Impressionist painters were Claude Monet, Pierre Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro.   The established painter Édouard Manet, whose work in the 1860s greatly influenced Monet and others of the group, himself adopted the Impressionist approach about 1873. Edgar Degas and Paul Cézanne also painted in an Impressionist style for a time in the early 1870s.

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Arts & English for young learners. Alojado en Educastur Blog.
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