Artículos de Enero 2015

New Year’s Resolutions

Viernes, 9 Enero 2015

 

 new-years-resolutions

A New Year’s resolution is a tradition, most common in the Western Hemisphere but also found in the Eastern Hemisphere, in which a person makes a promise to do an act of self-improvement or something slightly nice, such as opening doors for people beginning from New Year’s Day.

Babylonians made promises to their gods at the start of each year that they would return borrowed objects and pay their debts.

The Romans began each year by making promises to the god Janus, for whom the month of January is named.

In the Medieval era, the knights took the “peacock vow” at the end of the Christmas season each year to re-affirm their commitment to chivalry.

At watch night services, many Christians prepare for the year ahead by praying and making these resolutions.

There are other religious parallels to this tradition. During Judaism’s New Year, Rosh Hashanah, through the High Holidays and culminating in Yom Kippur, one is to reflect upon one’s wrongdoings over the year and both seek and offer forgiveness. People may act similarly during the Christian liturgical season of Lent, though the motive behind this holiday is more of sacrifice than of responsibility, in fact the practice of New Year’s resolutions partially came from the Lenten sacrifices. The concept, regardless of creed, is to reflect upon self-improvement annually.

Some examples include resolutions to donate to the poor more often, to become more assertive, or to become more environmentally responsible.

Popular goals include resolutions to improve physical or mental well-being, finances, career, education, etc…

A study in 2014 found that 42% of participants set themselves a New Years’ Resolution however, most failed at their goals. In fact, the study showed that 62% didn’t succeed with their resolutions. Interestingly, out of those who did achieve their resolutions 76% believed that sharing their goals, for example on a social networking service, helped reach them.

The most common reason for participants failing their New Years’ Resolutions was setting themselves unrealistic goals; others didn’t keep track of their progress, forgot about it, or made too many resolutions.