Artículos de Curiosities

10 Top Tourist Attractions in Switzerland

Jueves, 3 Agosto 2017

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Fidget Spinner

Domingo, 14 Mayo 2017

How to make a Fidget Spinner.

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How it works.

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A girl was found living among monkeys in an Indian forest. How she got there is a mystery.

Viernes, 7 Abril 2017

Amid a troop of monkeys in the Katraniaghat forest range in northern India roamed a naked human girl, playing with the primates as if she were one of them. She looked emaciated, her hair disheveled. But she appeared to be in a comfortable state, until the police arrived.

A group of woodcutters had alerted authorities after spotting the girl, believed to be 10 to 12 years old. When police approached her, the monkeys surrounded the girl, protecting her as one of their own, and attacking an officer as the girl screeched at him. After rescuing the girl, the officer sped away in his patrol car, the monkeys chasing him.

She was soon admitted to a state-run hospital in Bahraich, a city in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, where she has remained for the past two months. Doctors believe the girl had been raised by monkeys for quite some time, and her story has so far mystified authorities, sending them searching through reports of missing children in an attempt to identify her.

In the Indian press, the girl has also drawn comparisons to Rudyard Kipling’s Mowgli, a child from Seoni, India, featured as the prominent character in Kipling’s “The Jungle Book.”

Based on her behavior, it appears she could have lived among the primates since she was an infant. When the girl arrived at the hospital, she had wounds all over her body.

The thin, weak girl looked like she had not eaten for many days. Although she was capable of walking on her feet, she would sometimes suddenly drop down on all fours.

The way she moved, even her eating habits were like that of an animal. She would throw food on the ground and eat it directly with her mouth, without lifting it with her hands. She used to move around using only her elbows and her knees.

Now, doctors are tasked with teaching her how to transition to life as a human, a task that initially proved difficult because of her aversion to human interaction.

She behaves like an ape and screams loudly if doctors try to reach out to her. Another doctor treating her said the girl struggles to understand anything, and makes apelike noises and facial expressions.

But over the past two months, the girl’s health and behavior have improved significantly, doctors say. She has begun to walk normally by herself and eat food with her own hands. She is still unable to speak, and has begun to use gestures to communicate. Occasionally, she smiles.

Introducing Zealandia

Jueves, 2 Marzo 2017

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Scientists think New Zealand might be part of a lost underwater continent.

New Zealand is made up of many small islands, but geologists say they’re all connected by one underwater continent.

A group of geologists believes New Zealand and several surrounding islands, including New Caledonia, should be reclassified as part of an eighth continent called Zealandia. The archipelago, or group of islands, is currently grouped with Australia in the Australasia region. But scientists think there is enough geological evidence to give New Zealand its own continent designation.

The islands are connected by submerged continental crust. That crust, or outermost layer of earth, is separate and distinct from Australia and Antarctica. About 94% of that 1.9 million-square-mile land mass  is underwater. Still, the geologists argue that the area should count as its own continent.

The geologists spent more than two decades gathering enough data to make the case for Zealandia.

They argue that if Earth’s surface was mapped the way other planets have been—that is, without massive oceans to obscure landforms - Zealandia would long ago have been recognized as a continent.

Indian children died after eating lychees on empty stomach

Miércoles, 1 Febrero 2017

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USA and Indian scientists say a mystery illness that killed more than 100 children a year in northern India was caused by eating lychees on an empty stomach.

For more than two decades, apparently healthy children in a region of Bihar suffered sudden seizures and lost consciousness.

Almost half died, baffling doctors.

New research now suggests they were poisoned by the fruit.

Hypoglycin

Most of the victims were poor children in India’s main lychee-producing region who ate fruit that had fallen on to the ground in orchards, the journal said.

Lychees contain toxins that inhibit the body’s ability to produce glucose, which affected young children whose blood sugar levels were already low because they were not eating dinner.

They woke screaming in the night before suffering convulsions and losing consciousness as they suffered acute swelling of the brain.

Researchers examining sick children admitted to hospital in Muzaffarpur between May and July 2014 found a link to an outbreak of sickness that caused brain swelling and convulsions in children in the Caribbean.

That outbreak was caused by the ackee fruit, which contained hypoglycin, a toxin that prevents the body from making glucose. Tests then showed that lychees also contained hypoglycin.

This led health officials to tell parents to make sure young children got an evening meal and limit the number of lychees they were eating.

Children suffering symptoms associated with the outbreak should be rapidly treated for hypoglycaemia, or low blood sugar, officials said.

The number of reported cases of the sickness has since fallen from hundreds each year to about 50.

Swedish Taxi-pod

Domingo, 8 Enero 2017

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Students in Goteborg’s busy city centre do not need to take a bus or a traditional cab to travel through the city anymore. They can use a new service – a Taxi-pod, a three-wheeled yellow slightly miniature and battery-powered car.

The company Burst was founded in November 2014 with the idea to beat traffic. The idea is to solve the problem for traffic in centres in big cities. The company would like to provide a perfect service for short trips within the city from A to B. The idea is also to reduce vehicle emissions in central areas.

People using the bus travel probably for longer distances, they do not need to be in a hurry, and they do not need to get straight to their final destination. But for lots of people, traveling quickly is very important.

However, it is not just speed that concerns the makers of these cars, but improving the quality of air. They see a huge potential for solving congestion problems and problems with air quality in pretty much all cities across the globe.

One of the passengers finds that the Taxi-pods are environmentally friendly, cheap, easy to get by in the city and fun.

 

Johannes Stötter Art

Jueves, 1 Septiembre 2016

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What is glass?

Jueves, 2 Junio 2016

Believe it or not, glass is made from liquid sand. You can make glass by heating ordinary sand (which is mostly made of silicon dioxide) until it melts and turns into a liquid. You won’t find that happening on your local beach: sand melts at the incredibly high temperature of 1700°C (3090°F).

When molten sand cools, it doesn’t turn back into the gritty yellow stuff you started out with: it undergoes a complete transformation and gains an entirely different inner structure. But it doesn’t matter how much you cool the sand, it never quite sets into a solid. Instead, it becomes a kind of frozen liquid or what materials scientists refer to as an amorphous solid. It’s like a cross between a solid and a liquid with some of the crystalline order of a solid and some of the molecular randomness of a liquid.

Glass is such a popular material in our homes because it has all kinds of really useful properties. Apart from being transparent, it’s inexpensive to make, easy to shape when it’s molten, reasonably resistant to heat when it’s set, chemically inert (so a glass jar doesn’t react with the things you put inside it), and it can be recycled any number of times.

If you want to learn more about it, click on:

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXvyRZY05CU

 

Are Earthquakes in Japan and Ecuador Related? The Science Says No

Domingo, 1 Mayo 2016

Earthquakes of magnitudes exceeding 7.0 struck Japan and Ecuador just hours apart on Saturday. Are the two somehow related?

No. The two quakes occurred about 9,000 miles apart. That’s far too distant for there to be any connection between them.

Large earthquakes can, and usually do, lead to more quakes — but only in the same region, along or near the same fault. These are called aftershocks. Sometimes a large quake can be linked to a smaller quake that occurred earlier, called a foreshock. In the case of the Japanese quake, seismologists believe that several magnitude-6 quakes in the same region on the previous day were foreshocks to the Saturday event.

But the two earthquakes are similar in some ways, aren’t they?

Not really. The magnitude -7.8 quake in Ecuador was what would be considered a classic megathrust event. A megathrust quake occurs in the boundary zone where one of the planet’s tectonic plates is sliding under another, a process called subduction.

In the case of the Ecuadorean quake, the Nazca, a heavy oceanic plate, is sliding under the South American, a lighter continental plate, at a rate of about two inches a year. Strain builds up at the boundary, which is then released suddenly in the form of an earthquake. Because the boundary area is usually large, megathrust quakes are the most powerful and include the two strongest quakes ever measured by instruments: the magnitude-9.2 1964 Alaskan quake and one in coastal Chile in 1960 of magnitude 9.5.

Although there have been plenty of megathrust earthquakes in Japan — including the 2011 Tohoku quake, which led to the Fukushima nuclear disaster — the earthquake on Saturday on the island of Kyushu in southwest Japan was not the megathrust type. Rather, according to the geological survey, the earthquake occurred at shallow depth along a different kind of fault — called a strike-slip — in the top of the Eurasia plate, above any subduction zone.

O.K., but two 7.0-plus quakes in the same day — does that mean earthquake activity is increasing?

No. The geological survey, which monitors earthquakes around the world, says the average number of quakes per year is remarkably consistent. For earthquakes between magnitude 7.0 and 7.9, there have been some years with more than 20 and others with fewer than 10, but the average, according to the survey, is about 15. That means that there is more than one per month, on average, and by chance, sometimes two quakes occur on the same day. (Also by chance, the world sometimes goes a month or longer without a 7.0-plus quake, as it did between July 27 and Sept. 16 last year.)

Sometimes it seems that earthquakes are increasing in frequency because, as instrumentation improves and more people occupy more parts of the world, more quakes make the news. The two earthquakes on Saturday both occurred in heavily populated areas with media and communication networks, so word got out quickly and easily. If one had occurred in the middle of the ocean, few people would have noticed.

SALt lamp runs on a glass of water and two teaspoons of salt

Viernes, 1 Abril 2016

The Salt lamp runs for eight hours on a glass of saltwater.

 

Many of the more than 7,000 islands in the Philippines lack access to electricity, so after the sun goes down light usually comes by way of kerosene lamps. While cheap, these fire hazards are bad for the environment and human health. This, combined with the cost of keeping them burning has given one startup the impetus to build a better solution. The SALt (Sustainable Alternative Lighting) lamp burns for eight hours at a time running on only a glass of water and two teaspoons of salt.

Engineer and Greenpeace volunteer Aisa Mijeno came up with the idea for SALt after spending time with native Filipino tribes relying on kerosene lamps to perform everyday tasks after dark. She is looking to replace this hazardous light source with something the archipelago of the Philippines has in abundance: saltwater.

The SALt LED lamp relies on a galvanic cell battery, in which the electrolyte solution consists purely of salty water, into which two electrodes are placed. This is an approach we’ve seen used in battery designs for other LED lanterns, and is the basis of grander visions of a source of renewable energy.

Just like other batteries, the electrodes that carry the charge won’t last forever. The team says that the lamp can be used for eight hours a day for around six months before the anode needs replacing, which is still a whole lot less attention than is required for regular refills of a paraffin lantern. And it also claims that the finished product will generate enough power to charge Smartphones via the USB port on the side of the device.

To begin with, the company is aiming to deliver almost 600 lamps to native Filipino tribes, but it is also looking to ramp up production with plans to bring the lamp to market in early 2016. They haven’t told its price yet.